Only a couple of the Porsche 917s produced, were modified for road use. This one was ordered by a German hotelier.

Only a couple of the Porsche 917s produced, were modified for road use. This one was ordered by a German hotelier.


Source: forum.tz-uk.com
Ehemalige Jüdische Mädchenschule, a former Jewish girls’ school in Berlin built in 1927. It was one of the last pre-war buildings on the Berlin Jewish community’s terrain. After it was closed by the National Socialists in 1942 it was fitted out as a temporary hospital.
It has now been historically restored by Grüntuch Ernst Architects and re-opened as a space for art and cuisine. The former classrooms and corridors present changing exhibitions by different actors from the art world. Photo by Stefan Korte.

Ehemalige Jüdische Mädchenschule, a former Jewish girls’ school in Berlin built in 1927. It was one of the last pre-war buildings on the Berlin Jewish community’s terrain. After it was closed by the National Socialists in 1942 it was fitted out as a temporary hospital.

It has now been historically restored by Grüntuch Ernst Architects and re-opened as a space for art and cuisine. The former classrooms and corridors present changing exhibitions by different actors from the art world. Photo by Stefan Korte.


Source: bureau-n.de
2013 Jaguar F-Type V8 S in the Black Forest, Germany, by Fréderic Louis. (and that’s me).

2013 Jaguar F-Type V8 S in the Black Forest, Germany, by Fréderic Louis. (and that’s me).


Source: fredericlouis.be
The Zeppelin Railway Coach (Schienenzeppelin, also known as the Lightning Express) is photographed by the New York Times in 1931. Later that year, on June 21, 1931, it set a new rail speed record of 230.2 km/h (143.0 mph) on the Berlin–Hamburg line between Karstädt and Dergenthin, which was not surpassed by any other rail vehicle until 1954. 
The train could carry 40 passengers at 100 miles per hour (161 kph) in tests near Hanover, Germany. The caption notes, however, “its ability to take curves remains to be tested”. Safety and reliability concerns prevented it from being mass-produced as the project was dismantled in 1939.

The Zeppelin Railway Coach (Schienenzeppelin, also known as the Lightning Express) is photographed by the New York Times in 1931. Later that year, on June 21, 1931, it set a new rail speed record of 230.2 km/h (143.0 mph) on the Berlin–Hamburg line between Karstädt and Dergenthin, which was not surpassed by any other rail vehicle until 1954. 

The train could carry 40 passengers at 100 miles per hour (161 kph) in tests near Hanover, Germany. The caption notes, however, “its ability to take curves remains to be tested”. Safety and reliability concerns prevented it from being mass-produced as the project was dismantled in 1939.


Source: Wikipedia
Graham Hill behind the wheel of the legendary Lotus 49B, possibly taken over the jump at the start of Pflantzgarten at the 1969 German Grand Prix.

Graham Hill behind the wheel of the legendary Lotus 49B, possibly taken over the jump at the start of Pflantzgarten at the 1969 German Grand Prix.


Source: ausringers.com
Men of the American 7th Army pour through a breach in the Siegfried Line defenses, on their way to Karlsruhe, Germany on March 27, 1945, which lies on the road to Stuttgart. (AP Photo)

Men of the American 7th Army pour through a breach in the Siegfried Line defenses, on their way to Karlsruhe, Germany on March 27, 1945, which lies on the road to Stuttgart. (AP Photo)


Source: g503.com
A Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter being put into a wind tunnel at the “Hermann Goering” Aviation Research Institute, Braunschweig, Germany, 1940.

A Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter being put into a wind tunnel at the “Hermann Goering” Aviation Research Institute, Braunschweig, Germany, 1940.


Source: retronaut.com
A still from a 1955 British Pathé newsreel titled “World’s Most Dangerous Sport”, filmed in Bavaria, Germany. Notice that the driver of the Porsche 550 Spyder wears a helmet but the skiers do not.

A still from a 1955 British Pathé newsreel titled “World’s Most Dangerous Sport”, filmed in Bavaria, Germany. Notice that the driver of the Porsche 550 Spyder wears a helmet but the skiers do not.


Source: britishpathe.com
Carpenter company Feuerstein, Oberstaufen, Germany, by Architekten3p. Photo by Frank Stahl.

Carpenter company Feuerstein, Oberstaufen, Germany, by Architekten3p. Photo by Frank Stahl.


Source: Flickr / formsache
A fire helicopter trying to stop a raging wildfire in Porta Westfalica, Germany. Photo by Frank Wißmann.

A fire helicopter trying to stop a raging wildfire in Porta Westfalica, Germany. Photo by Frank Wißmann.


Source: 500px.com
The first big raid by the 8th Air Force was on a Focke Wulf (a German manufacturer of civil and military aircraft before and during World War II) plant at Marienburg. 1943, exact date shot unknown.

The first big raid by the 8th Air Force was on a Focke Wulf (a German manufacturer of civil and military aircraft before and during World War II) plant at Marienburg. 1943, exact date shot unknown.


Source:
Sneaking a kiss through the Berlin Wall.

Sneaking a kiss through the Berlin Wall.


Source: dequalized
The city of Cologne during WWII. Throughout all of World War II, Cologne endured 262 air raids by the Western Allies, which caused approximately 20,000 civilian casualties and almost completely wiped out the center of the city.
During the night of 31 May 1942, Cologne was the site of “Operation Millennium”, the first 1,000 bomber raid by the Royal Air Force in World War II. 1,046 heavy bombers attacked their target with 1,455 tons of explosives. This raid lasted about 75 minutes, destroyed 600 acres (243 ha) of built-up area, killed 486 civilians and made 59,000 people homeless.
By the end of the war, the population of Cologne was reduced by 95%. This loss was mainly caused by a massive evacuation of the people to more rural areas. The same happened in many other German cities in the last two years of war.

The city of Cologne during WWII. Throughout all of World War II, Cologne endured 262 air raids by the Western Allies, which caused approximately 20,000 civilian casualties and almost completely wiped out the center of the city.

During the night of 31 May 1942, Cologne was the site of “Operation Millennium”, the first 1,000 bomber raid by the Royal Air Force in World War II. 1,046 heavy bombers attacked their target with 1,455 tons of explosives. This raid lasted about 75 minutes, destroyed 600 acres (243 ha) of built-up area, killed 486 civilians and made 59,000 people homeless.

By the end of the war, the population of Cologne was reduced by 95%. This loss was mainly caused by a massive evacuation of the people to more rural areas. The same happened in many other German cities in the last two years of war.


Source:
hotphotography:

Müritzeum, Waren, Germany

hotphotography:

Müritzeum, Waren, Germany

(via hotphotography)


Source: hotphotography
subtilitas:

Tadao Ando - Stein sculpture museum, Bad Münster am Stein 2010. Via Ken Lee.

subtilitas:

Tadao Ando - Stein sculpture museum, Bad Münster am Stein 2010. Via Ken Lee.


Source: subtilitas